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The Florida Statutes

The 2022 Florida Statutes

Title XXX
SOCIAL WELFARE
Chapter 409
SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE
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F.S. 409.1454
409.1454 Motor vehicle insurance and driver licenses for children in care and certified unaccompanied homeless youth.
(1) The Legislature finds that the costs of driver education, licensure and costs incidental to licensure, and motor vehicle insurance for a child in out-of-home care or certain unaccompanied homeless youth certified under s. 743.067 after such child obtains a driver license create an additional barrier to engaging in normal age-appropriate activities and gaining independence and may limit opportunities for obtaining employment and completing educational goals. The Legislature also finds that the completion of an approved driver education course is necessary to develop safe driving skills.
(2) To the extent that funding is available, the department shall establish a program to pay the cost of driver education, licensure and other costs incidental to licensure, and motor vehicle insurance for a child who has completed a driver education program and who is:
(a) In out-of-home care; or
(b) Certified under s. 743.067 as an unaccompanied homeless youth and who is a citizen of the United States or legal resident of this state.
(3) If a caregiver, or an individual or not-for-profit entity approved by the caregiver, adds a child to his or her existing insurance policy, the amount paid to the caregiver or approved purchaser may not exceed the increase in cost attributable to the addition of the child to the policy.
(4) Payment must be made to eligible recipients in the order of eligibility until available funds are exhausted. If a child determined to be eligible reaches permanency status or turns 18 years of age, the program may pay for that child to complete a driver education program and obtain a driver license for up to 6 months after the date the child reaches permanency status or 6 months after the date the child turns 18 years of age. A child may be eligible to have the costs of and incidental to licensure paid if he or she demonstrates that such costs are creating barriers to obtaining employment or completing educational goals, if the child meets any of the following criteria:
(a) Is continuing in care under s. 39.6251;
(b) Was in licensed care when the child reached 18 years of age and is currently receiving postsecondary education services and support under s. 409.1451(2); or
(c) Is an unaccompanied homeless youth certified under s. 743.067 who is a citizen of the United States or legal resident of this state and is:
1. Completing secondary education;
2. Employed at least part time;
3. Attending any postsecondary education program at least part time; or
4. Has a disability that precludes full-time work or education.
(5) The department shall contract with a not-for-profit entity whose mission is to support youth aging out of foster care to develop procedures for operating and administering the program, including, but not limited to:
(a) Determining eligibility, including responsibilities for the child and caregivers.
(b) Developing application and payment forms.
(c) Notifying eligible children, caregivers, group homes, residential programs, local educational agency liaisons for homeless children and youth, and governmental or nonprofit agencies that provide services to homeless children or youth of the program.
(d) Providing technical assistance to lead agencies, providers, group homes, and residential programs to support removing obstacles that prevent children in foster care from driving.
(e) Publicizing the program, engaging in outreach, and providing incentives to youth participating in the program to encourage the greatest number of eligible children to obtain driver licenses.
History.s. 2, ch. 2014-166; s. 1, ch. 2017-8; s. 18, ch. 2021-169; s. 3, ch. 2022-65.